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Possibilities chart

A form of brainstorming that gives the participants an opportunity of visualising a future project or arrangement in an new way.

  • The participants imagine that the arrangement has already occurred and ‘recall memories’ of it that they write down on post-it slips
  • The slips are placed on a chart in relation to two coordinates: desirable <-> undesirable and likely <-> unlikely
  • This ‘chart of possibilities’, to which everyone has made a contribution, is then used for planning Read more ›
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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Markers

This is a quick way of arriving at and visualising joint priorities or rankings.

Each person is given the same number of markers (small adhesive slips or ticks with a marker pen) and distributes them among the alternatives or suggestions the group has already produced. Everyone is free to distribute the markers as they please. Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Beehive

A presentation is interrupted for a couple of minutes to allow the participants to discuss an issue in pairs.

See also the application Peter & Paul and the alternatives

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

SWOT

This is a method for examining the internal strengths and weaknesses of an organisation, the opportunities and threats presented by the outside world and how these factors affect problem-solving.

SWOT stands for Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Threat. Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Case

A narrative that describes a notional or an actual course of events.

It can be related in stages or all at once from beginning to end. The purpose is to give the participants an opportunity to discover possible choices and find solutions to a specific situation.

See also the applications Peter & Paul and the alternatives, Focus on the agenda and Rule of law and a fairly democratic country

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Cross sections

This is a simple and effective method for spreading information quickly in large groups. Together with rounds, it can maximise participation. Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Focus group

A focus group enables everyone to participate effectively by valuing and commenting on a particular theme. It lays a foundation for a plan of action by providing a comprehensive picture of the present situation. Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Dialogue conference

Up to a hundred people have an opportunity of exploring common interests, agreeing on interpretations and definitions, and arriving at joint suggestions for future work.

The conference consists of three rounds of group discussions, with up to 8 participants in each group. Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods Tagged with:

Four corners

Four corners is about forming an opinion and making a choice. It is a good way of beginning or depening a discussion and the method can be used with large groups. Even shy persons can express their attitudes without feeling exposed. Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Open space

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Open Space gives the participants – in contrast to a Dialogue conference – the possibility of introducing whichever issues they wish to the agenda and discussing them in groups of their own choosing.

The conference is divided into the following stages: Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Hot seat

The Hot Seat is another, more reflective, method for encouraging participants to take a stand and express their values openly. They indicate their opinion by standing up or sitting down.

Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Techniques for domination

Every now and then a couple of persons can dominate a meeting using various methods of manipulation.

A Norwegian professor of social psychology, Berit Ås, has identified five techniques for domination that are used by men to assert themselves in relation to female colleagues, but these discriminatory practises can be directed against anyone, regardless of their gender:

Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Brainstorming

Get the group to associate freely around an issue, a statement or a word. Make a note of every suggestion from every participant:

  • no idea is wrong
  • no one is to comment on other people’s ideas
  • agreement is not required
  • keep it going. All that matters is getting numerous alternatives uninhibitedly Read more ›
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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

The fridge

Lack of time is the major obstacle to effective participation. This is particularly evident when a sizeable group discusses something: matters come up that have to be set aside.

A solution is to place them in a Fridge for the time being: issues raised + the name of the persons who bring them up are noted on a flip-over sheet. Later, when there is a suitable opportunity, time is devoted to emptying the fridge. For this, the method Common agenda can be used to advantage.

See also the application Peter & Paul and the alternatives

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

The line

This is a method for valuation that can be used in almost any situation where there is enough space. It works well as a starter, as a quick check of the situation or as a concluding assessment. Read more ›

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Posted in Method Bank, Methods

Common agenda

This tool creates an open and jointly decided distribution of power during a meeting. It starts with a round in which all those present are given an opportunity to state:

  • what issue they want to raise
  • whether it is a matter of information, a discussion or a decision
  • how long the item is likely to take Read more ›
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Posted in Instruments for better meetings, Method Bank, Methods

Rotating functions at a meeting

Facilitating a meeting is a complex matter and is preferably shared by a number of people. If the functions are circulated among the members of the organization, everyone will become acquainted with how the organization works and feel responsible for the meetings: Read more ›

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Posted in Instruments for better meetings, Method Bank, Methods

Speaker’s ball

A soft and light ball that visually signals who is speaking and puts attention on the speaker. The holder of the ball is authorised to voice an opinion without being interrupted. Read more ›

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Posted in Instruments for better meetings, Method Bank, Methods

Rounds

Each person in turn has a minute or so in which to say what is on their mind without being interrupted and with no questions, comments or discussion. No one is obliged to speak. As a round should continue without being controlled, it is important to start by adopting a theme, for instance: Read more ›

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Posted in Instruments for better meetings, Method Bank, Methods